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Mixing Oil With Grease in Open Gear Lubrication
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Level 1 - 1 to 50 posts
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Hi Everyone!

We are currently using Ceplatyn NLGI 2 for our open gear lubrication for the drag chain of our cement plant. Lately we came up with an idea of mixing an ISO VG 680 oil improve the splashing effect of the grease.

Is this idea of mixing oil with grease a good idea for open gear lubrication? And what NLGI number would normally fit in for an open gear lubrication?
 
Posts: 4 | Location: Pjilippines | Registered: Wed February 27 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Level 4 - 251 to 500 posts
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Hi

ISO 680 is most likely OK for open gear application,
grease diluted with oil in the field mixes tend to be unstable for forming a constant NLGI # rating as some grease soaps separate off addition oil leaving the base oil free, carefully check the types of additives used in the two products being mixed to ensure no incompatibility, for correct NLGI rating loosen the grease by adding extra base oil until the correct "Splash for dispersing the gear fluid for best lubrication for the open gears occurs, then monitor by microscope to check wear rate is acceptable from the mixture and ensure environmental dirt contamination does not become a problem.

Regards

Rob S
 
Posts: 294 | Location: Australia | Registered: Wed January 14 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Level 3 - 101 to 250 posts
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I wouldn't recommend "making your own" grease. It would be better to get a grease with the correct viscosity from the start that has been properly formulated for the task at hand. If your looking for some "splash effect" then NGLI #2 is probably to thick unless it's in a very hot environment. It sounds like your looking for a semi-fluid grease, something in the NGLI #0 or #00 range. The NGLI #00 is similar to a very thick gear oil. Put some in a cup and tip it on it's side and it will begin to run out of the cup.

My suggestions would be either Millennium 2200 or Takilube, both which come in NGLI #0 and #00 (the more 0's the thinner the grease). I'm not sure how your applying the grease but the Takilube is available in caulking tubes as well as regular pail and drum containers. The caulking tubes make hand application very easy. I would also recommend the Takilube in very dirty environments as that is what it is designed for, that being exposed gears, dipper stick and rack's as well as chains and cables.

In any case I wouldn't suggest formulating your own by mixing grease and gear oil, the properties of the resulting blend will be unknown to you until it is to late.


Michael Bialecki
Texas Refinery Corp.
www.trclubricants.com
 
Posts: 215 | Location: PA. USA | Registered: Mon September 18 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Level 1 - 1 to 50 posts
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Why spend thousands on equipment and then pennies on lubricant? The correct lubricant for the application will increase the life of your equipment. You mentioned Ceplattyn which is an open gear lubricant but there is more than one product in the Ceplattyn range of products. I would recommend that you speak to the company you bought the product from, they will be able to assist you with the correct product for your application.

Good Luck, don’t be Penny wise and Pound foolish.
 
Posts: 2 | Location: United Kingdom | Registered: Mon June 15 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Hi Kabayan,

I have pictures that I can show you how we lubricate chain, from there you will get ideas how you can apply it. Please email me at memolub.ae@gmail.com

Best regards,


Danny Reyes
Memolub Distributor, UAE
www.memolub.tk
+971 55 6689558/+971509921518
 
Posts: 46 | Location: Dubai, UAE | Registered: Fri June 15 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Level 2 - 51 to 100 posts
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We have been using a straight EP oil on chains for many years. The type of application will determine the viscosity used. A very simple and yet very effective way of doing it is to use a sheet of wool bearing felt and use a simple automated system to apply to the felt. It maintains a volume of lubricant in the felt which the chain then picks up every revolution. On a cement kiln, I would think that even a 320 would work fine because it also would have the ability to wick into the pins and bushings, where the lubricant is required. Putting oil on the outside of the chain does little for you, unless you can get it inside. With the heat, you may get this action with a 680 as well but it may not be as effective. Hit me offline and I would be happy to do a volume calculation for you and show you how simple this application really is.

deanm@autolube.ca

www.autolube.ca
 
Posts: 51 | Location: Red Deer, AB | Registered: Tue March 28 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Contact Klueber Philippines for professional advice.

Regards,

Ciprian Popescu
 
Posts: 28 | Location: Romania | Registered: Thu July 16 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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