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Read our primer articles on High Mileage Oil, Synthetic Oil and Kinematic Viscosity

After much research I started using Amsoil Motor Oil approximately 12 years ago. Still for example in many publications like the Turbo Diesel Register and rv.net they report great reviews of Amsoil products. I drive about 500 miles a week to work and back round trip. In my 87 Toyota I have been using Amsoil 2000series oil and in my 99 Dodge Cummins pickup I been using Amsoil 3000 heavy duty turbo diesel oil. In both vehicles I conducted oil analysis about every 15,000 miles on the truck and every 25,000 miles on the car. The car has 350,000 miles on it and for example, after 35,000 miles on the same oil; the analysis says the oil is still in good condition and the truck after have 44,000 mile on the same oil; each time the oil analysis comes back saying the oil is in good condition. I do have the Amsoil bypass filtration system on both vehicles.

I am not trying to start a war. I am just trying to become better educated in the field of liberation as a consumer. What truly is the best brand of synthetic motor oil? What are the consumers and experts thoughts?

Chuck
Original Post

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quote:
Originally posted by Callisa:
Well, I guess there is now such thing as a "best of all" oil. You could do the same discussion in another board asking for the best religion.
You will never get an appropriate answer.

If you are happy with your oil, then continue using it.


Very nicely said, it is as passionate as discussion on religion. Best oil is what keeps your engine happy mile after mile and doesnt hurt your pocket in return.
I agree to keep using whatever makes you happy, amsoil certainly has some very nice products, and you seem to have an excellent plan. However, for the sake of discussion:


Amsoil, has some great products, some OK products and some that are merely OK and overpriced (like their oil filters). Amsoil's dealer system allows some absolute morons to tarnish the entire organization (claiming that mobil 1 is group III based, outrageous OCI claims, etc). Amsoil's own marketing hypes tests (4-ball wear) that make their products look great, but have minimal relvance to actual conditions, espicially compared to performance on used oil analysis.

I'd say that Mobil products are the only syn oils availble over the counter worth using. In the Mobil 1 line, I'd say that the 10W30, 15W50, and 5W40 are excellent, and the others are slightly less impressive.



I don't trust Castrol enough to feel entirely comfortable with their only common syn oil, German 0W30.

I think that Redline, Royal Purple and Neo are overpriced, hard to find, and offer virtually no performance advantages, at least in engine oils.
I've been in the lubricants business since 1979. I've sold and used just about every brand available. After my years of research, I'm now convinced that AMSOIL is the superior product line. My 1998 Ford E-350 has right at 415,000 miles on it, changing oil every 20,000 miles and oil filters ever 10,000. The savings in oil changes alone is enough to purchase a new van, and I might add, I don't need to.
Quote:

I'd say that Mobil products are the only syn oils availble over the counter worth using. In the Mobil 1 line, I'd say that the 10W30, 15W50, and 5W40 are excellent, and the others are slightly less impressive.

I don't trust Castrol enough to feel entirely comfortable with their only common syn oil, German 0W30.

End of Qote

Well, I have seen two engine having run on a dyno under same test conditions, one with Mobil 1 0W-40 and one with a german version of Castrol Syntec 0W-30.

Mobil 1 is good, but Castrol is (at least in this engine, within this test) clearly the winner. Better piston cleanliness, better wear performance.
Ahh, I should have said "In North America", my apologizes.

I like Castrol 0W30, in fact, I use it in one of my personal cars. However, like I said, I'm not horribly comfortable with it, since Castrol seems to change their North American formulations on a whim, not to mention the shift from PAO to Group III without a drop in price, or notifying the consumer in anyway whatsoever.

I'm also hesitant to reccomend the 0w30 to the average consumer here since they will have to search quite a bit to find it in some areas, and definitely need to carefully check every bottle to weed out the Group III version.
I will have to weigh on this discussion with my own personal favorite: SynLube.

This formula is produced by a very small company but that doesn't mean that they just repackage an oil for sale. They have a unique product.

Composed of 3 solid (all in submicronic form) and 5 liquid lubricants, this oil is designed to last 150K miles/3K engine hours or 10 years. It can last this long because the components are almost entirely enert. And neither summer or winter extreme of temperature is a problem. It is appropriate for any gasoline engine (except rotaries) and any diesel, though the service life is 2K hours in this type engine. Dry lubrication conditions are completely eliminated.

This oil costs substantially more at purchase ($32/quart) but per mile is cheaper than most any oil out there. It is about a quarter of the cost of the 3K dino oil regimen, assuming $25 per change.

I have about 4 years of experience with this oil though that experience is divided out over three vehicles so I don't have any impressive personal figures to report yet. The longest in any one vehicle I have used this lubricant was 18K miles in a Ford Focus. Oil consumption during that time was 4.5 ounces. My current ride, a Ford Ranger has about 6K miles and I will be keeping this vehicle a long time.

At the end of the service life, the oil can be returned to the company and they will provide you with a credit towards the purchase of new oil. The old oil will be microfiltered and the additive package rebalanced. It will then be good as new and will have the same warranty.

They make similar products for the transmissions (both manual and automatic), differential, power steering etc. They have a coolant that lasts 300K miles.

When I first read about this oil, I was a bit skeptical as most people are but when I got back some good answers to my questions, I went ahead and tried their products. I have never had a problem.
I would agree, oil is like religion and politics.

But I have been using Amsoil products since 1977 and am of the opinion they are the best. The price does not bother me because I never fell into the hype that oil has to be changed at 3000 or 5000 miles intervals. I change once yearly and that has proven very effective for my vehicles and my wallet.

All the complaining about this test and that test also has little influence on me. As for morons in the business of selling. I am afraid every field is afflicted and it not exclusive to Amsoil distributors. Just because one person finds someone a moron does not make it so.

I currently use Amsoil products in these vehicles;
1992 Chev 4x4 pickup (plow truck)
1993 Lumina Sedan (got new)
2002 Pontiac Trans Am WS6 (hotrod)
2004 GMC SLT Ext Cab Z71 (daily cruzer)
+
2001 Honda Rancher 4x4
2001 Honda lawn-mower
Huskavarna weedwacker and chain saw
It's also depends a little bit on the region you live, the base stocks available and the blenders being used of course...and not to forget the available additive packages. I know there are a lot of oil companies in Europe which have products which have different characteristics per country, due to the facts mentioned above.
quote:
Originally posted by Callisa:
Quote:

I'd say that Mobil products are the only syn oils availble over the counter worth using. In the Mobil 1 line, I'd say that the 10W30, 15W50, and 5W40 are excellent, and the others are slightly less impressive.

I don't trust Castrol enough to feel entirely comfortable with their only common syn oil, German 0W30.

End of Qute

Well, I have seen two engine having run on a dyno under same test conditions, one with Mobil 1 0W-40 and one with a german version of Castrol Syntec 0W-30.

Mobil 1 is good, but Castrol is (at least in this engine, within this test) clearly the winner. Better piston cleanliness, better wear performance.
quote:
Originally posted by Callisa:
What's so special about Redline? Their marketing, or their products?

Definitely the product. Quality is their goal and price falls where it may. At least with Redline you should be able to be assured of getting the company's best effort at producing an oil. Other companies, subject to competition, will invariably have to cut costs.

I believe Redline is the best oil in certain applications, such as racing, but certainly not for the family car as in that application it would be overkill. Not being an expert, though, I am hoping to hear from others at this site who may know more about Redline.

I do feel that Redline is a great way to go for gear lube and transmission fluid, applications where the oil is in the unit for much longer time and thus the high cost is justified IMO.
quote:
Definitely the product. Quality is their goal and price falls where it may. At least with Redline you should be able to be assured of getting the company's best effort at producing an oil. Other companies, subject to competition, will invariably have to cut costs.


I always look at the releases of an oil to understand what capabilities it has. But I do not see many releases on their top products. How do I seperate marketing from quality?
quote:
Originally posted by Callisa: I always look at the releases of an oil to understand what capabilities it has. But I do not see many releases on their top products. How do I seperate marketing from quality?
Not sure what you mean by "releases," but they do have a listing of technical data at the website. Are you looking at the UK Redline site or the USA site (which I am more familiar with and is redlineoil.com)?
quote:
Originally posted by Callisa:
quote:
Not sure what you mean by "releases,"


e.g.
VW 502.00
Ford WSS...
BMW Longlife-02
ACEA A3/B3/B4

These are releases. More releases (and up to date!) means better for me.

I have another rather stupid question.
What is "Dino" oil? Is this a simpel mineral based oil? Or is it a special brand?


I don't see releases on the Redline site. They do show the API service classes.

Dino, oh yeah. A term that is flung around a lot at the oil guy site. I guess in the industry the term used is "conventional." Yep, just a term for mineral oil, Group I through II+. But what is Group III, synthetic or dino? Both?
Calissa, Very interesting link. So Nexbase 3000 is a Group III that is different from, and apparently better than, other Group III base oils. Also, did I see something about it being lower cost? I would not mind using Group III at more reasonable prices. Picked up some NAPA synthetic, which likely is group III, for only $2.69 a bottle on sale. But typical Group III based multigrade in USA is around $4 a bottle and you can get Mobil 1 PAO on sale for that, so why get Group III. But I think over time there will be a focus on the boundary area between synthetic and conventional and Group II+ and III will become more prevalant, but the USA consumer must get over the 3000 mile oil change that has been pounded into their heads by the oil companies, especailly those that have quick lube type establishments.
sorry, I apparently was not clear and you misunderstood. I realize Nexbase is a base oil supplier, but I thought they were getting a lower priced product that hopefully would be reflected in lower retail oil prices.

Ha Ha, at least my wayward playing with oil is providing amusement for you and likely many others. They probably think "these Americans have too much money and no sense." But I know I don't need all this extra stuff. I just like to play around with the stuff.
Dinio is Mineral

For hot temperature performance an ester is needed, so RL Motul Silkolene use these in race oils.

Shell and Castrol use a more refined GIII with nearly as good performance as PAO but cheaper.

However fairly certain in top range motorsport oils these are GIII PAO and ester blended. The blend may produce a better oil as an overall package but difficult to tell but RL on paper would appear to be best.

With racing Fuel dilution can be a problem hence the 10W60 oils from Motul and Castrol.

These products are being used in extreme circumstances which are not normally needed in road cars.

As far as I am aware in Germany Sythetic oil has to be a true synthetic and not GIII, so German Castrol could be a better basestock.

Castrol also sell Magnatec which is mineral but with esters for start up protection, PAO's are not polar.
Consider using oil analysis to determine the "best" lube for your vehicles. Good labs and analysts are able to provide background to aim you in the correct direction from the myriad of reports they view and study.

All the "releases" and bench testing are not the actual real world operation that a used oil analysis will provide in the hands of the experienced analyst.
Redline is based on polyol esters ideally suited for the higher temperature applications where the performance of diesters and PAOs begin to fade, ie racing.

The other off the shelf similar product is Motul, and Silkolene has 20% diester with PAO, good for say a road track car.

I assume M1 Castrol Shell use esters in greater quantities in their oils used for motorsport rather than off the shelf version oils.

Dino = made in the time of the dinosaurs
"Composed of 3 solid (all in submicronic form) and 5 liquid lubricants, this oil is designed to last 150K miles/3K engine hours or 10 years. It can last this long because the components are almost entirely enert."

$32/Qt. ! Wow ! I'm not questioning the quality of the oil but I do have a question - How do you market this type of cost to your client's ? Even here on this site where we find many very intelligent oil folks and you can hear many comments about how an oil that costs $ 6.00/qt. is too much. My main reason for asking is simply this: If you're marketing your product to a trucking company with large sumps, how do you sell them on up front cost -vs- value being purchased ? This would be a substantial investment for a company with 60 over-the-road diesels. Thanks in advance.
KEVIN: With regard to trucking firms, I am not very familiar with their needs and problems so I can't say but SynLube does have trucking customers who apparently find the oil worthwhile. The HSHT of this oil is 5.0cP which is extremely important for truckers since the engine is almost always under heavy load. I understand that engines with SynLube installed when new last over 1,000,000 miles.

With regard to individual users like you and I, the economies of this lubricant are undeniable, even if you do your own oil changes. On one of the previous posts I did provide an example of the savings that SynLube provides and their website also discusses this advantage.

Plug in your costs for the oil you currently use over a 150K mile or ten year period and contrast that with SynLube. You will readily see that you should save at least a couple of hundred dollars. Of course, much more important to me is that I don't have to change the oil and the engine protection, in my opinion, is second to none. No one that I've known to try this oil has been disappointed.

Oil consumption has been on the order of 40-60K miles per quart on the vehicles I've had with SynLube in them.
quote:
Originally posted by Callisa:
HTHS is one of the most missunderstood characterisrics of oil. Having an extreme high HTHS value gives no security at all. I don't understand why people don't understand this.
I would like to know more about this. It seems to me that, since HTHS is a measure of viscosity, one would want it to be within a reasonable range, not too high, not too low. I would suspect diesels would need a higher HTHS than gasoline engines which have excellent durability with oils having HTHS viscosity in the range of about 3.0 to 3.6 cSt. The new 5w20 oils with HTHS below 3.0 do make me hesitant, but for now my older vehicles do not spec such thin oils.
RE HSHT:
quote:
Even more important is the High-Shear High-Temperature MINIMUM specification in SAE J300. In tables below you will notice that there are "two" SAE 40 specifications, one with minimum HSHT value of 2.9 cP for Automotive Oils (SAE 0W-40; 5W-40; 10W-40) and the other for Heavy Duty Oils (HDO) (SAE 15W-40; 20W-40; 25W-40; 40).

This double specification is at insistence of heavy duty engine manufacturers who have required HSHT viscosity limits consistent with good engine durability in high-load, severe service operation. HSHT value of 3.7 cP or 27% more viscous oil at 150ºC (300ºF).

Yes, a 27% increase in viscosity makes a difference between Automotive engine that lasts 100,000 miles and Truck engine that lasts 1,000,000 miles!

When you consider that most Automotive Motor Oils are ONLY 3 cP, while our SAE 5W-50 SynLube™ Lube-4-Life™ Motor Oil has rating of 5 cP, you can readily appreciate why we can claim 300% to 500% increase in typical Automotive engine durability, and that is with substantial "safety" reserve!


quote:
It seems to me that, since HTHS is a measure of viscosity, one would want it to be within a reasonable range, not too high, not too low.

HTHS is a virtual dynamic viscosity at 150°C and a shear rate of 20 m/sec. It was "invented" due to the fact at the beginning of the 80's engines failed with oil of an HTHS < 2,0.
During a SAE congress in the 80's, all members agreed, that the available data showed that an HTHS > 2,5 is fair enough for every engine on the market in those days.
High HTHS values give you a fuel penalty. Depending on your engine, you will experience a higher fuel consumption of 2% if you use an oil with HTHS of 5 instead of 2,9.
Either your engine is durable, or it is not. If it is durable, high HTHS values don't give you a "safety margin". Thats especially true for your normal car, and that's also true for Diesel engines. Roll Eyes
SynLube has this to say about fuel consumption in regard to viscosity:
quote:
If you are leasing a vehicle, then the BETTER mileage parameter is definitely more important as well as cost effective. You just do not care how long will engine last on a car that you will only operate for 24,000 to 36,000 miles. But how many gallons of fuel you will burn will make a difference.

If you own your vehicle for the long haul, or indefinitely, then SAE 5W-50 is absolute must!

That is why SynLube Lube-4-Life is available ONLY in that grade, since we guarantee 300,000-mile service life from engines that were engineered to last no more than 100,000 to 150,000 miles. It makes that much difference!

But due to unique colloidal technology used in SynLube™ Lube-4-Life™ you still get mileage benefit that is 1.6% to 2% better than even SAE 5W-20 petroleum motor oils that are now used by OEM's.


Actually, SynLube does make a 5W20 oil on request but only guarantees it for 70K miles.
Redline uses a different ASTM method for HT/HS than Valvoline , Pennzoil and other oil makers .

Sorry , I cannot recall the differences in these methods .

Solids . All moly's are solids correct ? Even the newer oil soluable type used in most car oils ?

quote:
Originally posted by MGBV8:
Redline HTHS

15W-50 5.8 M1 15W-50(5.11)
20W-50 6.1

Redline should go on forever and no need for solid additives.
Callisa

HTHS is a means of comparing oils of same viscosity when in the performance area, greater film strength at same oil temp, or dropping viscosity giving greater flow but maintaing film strength.
Porsche specify 3.6 or above.

As far as I know
MoS2 is a suspended, non-soluble micro-powder. As such it can settle out in storage when used as an additive in motor oil. However, MoDTC is a fully oil soluble salt, will not settle out in storage, and, in solution, passes freely through the oil filter. (Since it's in solution, it can't "clump".) However, heat and pressure (of which there's plenty inside an operating engine at points of sliding metal-to-metal "contact") will allow the molybdenum to be deposited and "fused" with those sliding metal surfaces as an anti-wear, last-line-of-defense, extreme pressure agent micro-coating in the event the oil film is briefly disrupted.
To understand the situation today, you have to understand what happened in the past. Early XW-30 formulations where by far not as capable concerning wear protection as they are today. It is believed and commonly accepted by mechanical engineers (not by Lube Engineers...) that the conrod bearings of high RPM engines need high viscosity / HTHS oils to survive.
But "lessons learned" from the past with these early formulations are still very deep in the heads of the engineers at Porsche, Alfa, Ferrari etc.
Mechanical Engineers are a conservative, tough crowd... Roll Eyes
Callisa,

Going back in history, if you take a classic mini then a 20W50 was specified, but then it did chew improvers.
With more wear on start up perhaps with more stable oils 10W40 appeared to be standard recommendation and now M1 0W40 with HTHS of 3.6.

If a minimum HTHS of 2.6 is required to prevent excessive wear, this may only be ok if not using car after warranty period.

Honda may therefore specify a 0W20 for a high rev engine, however BMW found a problem with some engines and specified a xW60.

Somewhere inbetween may be a good compromise but we are limited by the Mechanical Engineers view of wear in the whole engine and protecting the weak spots.

Without guidance there appears to be a risk to move away from the manual for any particular engine.

Therefore can reducing viscosity and improving flow and temperature control make up for the higher protection provided by a higher viscosity and HTHS, and is it worth taking that risk and dropping viscosity?

The comparison is that WRC use a 5W40 but F1 use a straight 5 or 10.
quote:
however BMW found a problem with some engines and specified a xW60.

True. They found a problem with the engine and fixed the engine hardware problem with oil!

quote:
Without guidance there appears to be a risk to move away from the manual for any particular engine.


True. I wrote that in the past more than once.

quote:
higher protection provided by a higher viscosity and HTHS

Let's say you are 1 meter away from an edge. Behind the edge is the Grand Canyon, and you may fall down and hurt yourself.
Are you now safer by staying two meters awy from the edge instead of one meter?
I don't think so. Wink
quote:
Originally posted by Callisa:
quote:
higher protection provided by a higher viscosity and HTHS

Let's say you are 1 meter away from an edge. Behind the edge is the Grand Canyon, and you may fall down and hurt yourself.
Are you now safer by staying two meters awy from the edge instead of one meter?
I don't think so. Wink
I prefer 2 meters as it exceeds my height a bit. Therefore if I fall, I fall entirely on solid ground, not 40% over the abyss, which very well might propell me over the edge. Eek
Callisa,

My assumption is that the oil engineer will spec the oil according to the weakest link within engine and current oil specification.

However its also possible that the car could be used for short shopping trips or an owner that lets the horses loose.

The oil engineer I assume takes this into account.

With Porsche the latter owner is more likely and perhaps therefore the 3.6 HTHS recommendation. Wheras the former driver may require improved mpg so a thinner oil is specified.

So the Porsche owner may actually want to stand on the edge a little more often.

The paradox is that by using a thinner oil with more flow and better cooling, you may be able to stand on edge anyway.

My problem is the manual was written 30 years ago and specified a 20W/50 Mineral oil.
quote:
Originally posted by Callisa:
Well, what can one expect if someone stores oil for the next 3 years in his cellar... Big Grin
My stash has dropped below 100 quarts. There is a sale on Valvoline at Pep Boys. Guess I'm going to buy some more oil today. Hopefully there is still some SL on the shelves. None of that watered down SM stuff for me! Big Grin
quote:
My stash has dropped below 100 quarts. There is a sale on Valvoline at Pep Boys. Guess I'm going to buy some more oil today. Hopefully there is still some SL on the shelves. None of that watered down SM stuff for me!


Stay with ACEA A3/B3/B4 2002 oil qualities if you don't want to switch to API SM. I made some time ago a comparison in terms of testing limits allowed between ACEA and API SL. You will get for sure a better oil quality with ACEA. Wink
quote:
My assumption is that the oil engineer will spec the oil according to the weakest link within engine and current oil specification.

He Specs the oil according to the service interval requirements and weakest point of the engine, than designs his oil specification. The mineral oil guys will do an oil development if they see a business case for such an oil quality.

quote:
However its also possible that the car could be used for short shopping trips or an owner that lets the horses loose.

Short trip cycle is worst case. The oil has to be changed anyway no matter what quality is used. An owner that lets the horses loose is best case for gasoline engines. He will accumulate miles within a short time and has to go to an oil change after a fixed limit. (e.g Germany for many OEM's: 30.000 km)

quote:
Wheras the former driver may require improved mpg so a thinner oil is specified.
Yes.
quote:
Originally posted by Callisa:
Stay with ACEA A3/B3/B4 2002 oil qualities if you don't want to switch to API SM. I made some time ago a comparison in terms of testing limits allowed between ACEA and API SL. You will get for sure a better oil quality with ACEA. Wink
Thanks for the advice. I know my 29 quarts of 10w40 SL Durablend are ACEA A3 (the new SM is not Eek ).

Hey, here is a real winner:

Valvoline Synpower 5w40 Cool :
SM/SL
ACEA A3/B3/B4
Mercedes Benz 229.3
VW 502.00 and 505
BMW Long Life 01
Zinc 1020 ppm
Phosphorus 900 ppm
Calcium 3300 ppm
Last edited by tallpaul
quote:
Any info on this process with regard to parameters when specifiying an oil.

It depends "who is the boss". Sometimes it's marketing, sometimes the lube engineers, somtimes the engine developers, these days the catalyst guys want to change the oil.

quote:
How about short cycle and long weekend blast.

That really seems to be the very best method to kill the oil. I have not seen a more effective way. It's similar to police driving, which is the worst case driving condition for gasoline engines in Europe.

quote:
Car use and maintenace of car re fuelling etc may have a more significant effect on wear rather than the oil itself!

Yes.

@TallPaul
That's the way to select a good oil - look at specifications. Forget the amount elements. It's like saying: This picture has such an amount of red colour, green colour, blue colour - this must be a good picture. If it is from Picasso or from your 4 year old daughter - how do you know???
I saw a bit different result in a testing program .

The Mobil 0w-40 made both more horsepower on a engine dyno and had less amounts in particle counts in same engine , back to back testing vs Castrol SLX 0w-30 .

Not saying your wrong Callisa , just posting what I saw from another test .

That 0w-40 Mobil is really something else IMO . It meets both GM LL specs and the LL-01 .

quote:
Originally posted by Callisa:

Well, I have seen two engine having run on a dyno under same test conditions, one with Mobil 1 0W-40 and one with a german version of Castrol Syntec 0W-30.

Mobil 1 is good, but Castrol is (at least in this engine, within this test) clearly the winner. Better piston cleanliness, better wear performance.
quote:
The Mobil 0w-40 made both more horsepower on a engine dyno and had less amounts in particle counts in same engine , back to back testing vs Castrol SLX 0w-30 .

Particles where not counted in that test. The difference in the power output could be explained with the standard deviation of the dyno test rig or a different atmospheric pressure. Can you exclude that in your testing?
Besides, one oil does not have to work good in all engines designs if it works well in one.
quote:
Originally posted by Callisa:
quote:
How about short cycle and long weekend blast.

That really seems to be the very best method to kill the oil. I have not seen a more effective way. It's similar to police driving, which is the worst case driving condition for gasoline engines in Europe.

I often hear folks ask what to do about a short trip vehicle and the typical advice is to take it on a long freeway run periodically. So that does not really help? I have such a vehicle ('92 Aerostar 3.0) and have turned to trying synthetic oil in it for the typical 4000 miles per year.
quote:
I often hear folks ask what to do about a short trip vehicle and the typical advice is to take it on a long freeway run periodically. So that does not really help?

It really depends now on lot on each specific case. If you accumulate water in your oil (creamy white sludge on oil filler cap) regularly, I'd change the oil every 6 months. To use a synthetic oil is a waste of money in this case. Even the best oil can't withstand these conditions for long. I have seen a case with 80% city cycle driving and 20% autobahn driving (both in km) in total 6.500 km with a longlife oil - the oil analysis was a desaster. It looked like as if it was driven for 50.000 km high speed driving.
If you do not see "white sludge" in your engine, the oil ages most of the time in a "normal way". In this case you may increase your service interval with a synthetic oil compared to a dino oil.
quote:
Originally posted by Callisa:
[QUOTE] If you do not see "white sludge" in your engine, the oil ages most of the time in a "normal way". In this case you may increase your service interval with a synthetic oil compared to a dino oil.
Thanks. No white sludge. Of course, with a 0.3 meter long oil filler neck, snaking almost horizontally to an accessible, it may not be apparent. But I think I am all right on that. The engine seems to warm up quick and run hot (partly due to the tight engine slot, no engine bay here), I'll see if I can get synthetic to run clean for long enough as the first load dirtied up in about 4 months (1600 miles/ ~2400 km?).
quote:
Http://www.performanceoilnews.com/oils_against_oils.shtml


Hehehehe, this is a funny test! I made a lot of research work on the shown Dana Wix filter. The deviation shown on the particle side is the same like the media has. Are you now testing oils or testing oilfilters from a single production batch?

The true testing of an oil is to take a batch of production engines coming from the same line,
tear down the new engines and measure critical parts, reassemble them, run each of them for at least 300-400 hrs with one oil, and then do engine tear down. You also have to take some statistics of your measurement into consideration.

This test is nice, but not a scientific wear test. Big Grin
A power improvement of 15% with an additive.... Roll Eyes
Back to the topic .

As new additives have come out and when companies are willing to use them I think it's evident that old pao/ester oils can be beat by group III /pao oils w/5% ester . The other slack wax group III with ester makes for good oil but I do not see companies give them big additization due to cost in all probability .

Esters a name for many different types of it . I'm not a chemist but if making an oil I'd sure try to use some d-basic in there along with pao and slack wax or other group III . D-basic gives oils great lubricity even when used in small amounts .

It's funny , the better 5-10 synthetic oils out there come at 1/2 the price of some other high end oils .

Some of these gasoline engines with light ring tension and short piston skirts need the oil dumped fairly often anyway . One key to success is knowing if you own one of these engines then pick a suitable oil and oil change interval for it .
hi ive always used mobil one had a 88 z28 and i drove it hard and i mean hard i had compression test done and at 190k it was as new i bought a kia spectra ive used mobil one from day one as well at 95k engine oil is like new now im a big fan. theres alot of info here what is best oil for my car price being no option ? what about filters whats top filter out there thanks for help
quote:
Originally posted by howdymiro:
i've mercedes c240 v6. 2002 USA made, (runtime reading - 74500 miles) engine manual recommends to change motor oil every after 10000 miles run (by using 10w-40) i'm just confused what brand to choose. PLS advice to get a correct decision.. thanks a lot


This is Mercedes current oil recommendations for your car. AMSOIL lists their recommendation.

2002 MERCEDES BENZ C240 2.6L 6-cyl Engine Code 112.912
LUBRICANTS & FLUIDS:
Engine Oil
Grade 1......SEO[1]
AMSOIL European Car Formula 100% Synthetic 5W-40 Motor Oil (AFLQT) http://www.amsoil.com/storefront/afl.aspx?zo=1181889 .
Above 5F......15W-40, 15W-50
Above -4F......10W-30, 10W-40, 10W-50, 10W-60
Above 23F......20W-40, 20W-50
All TEMPS......0W-30, 5W-30, 0W-40, 5W-40, 5W-50

[1] Use only synthetic engine oil formulated to meet
MB Sheet 229.3 or MB Sheet 229.5 or MB Sheet 229.51
quote:
Originally posted by howdymiro:
Thanks a lot Tim, but i'm not sure if we have here (in Rep. of Georgia) AMSOIL. We have a lot of diferent brands like SHELL & MOBILE1 & CASTROL.. etc(these 3 brands are most popular here)
So if i can't find AMSOIL i'll have to choose one of up named brandes. Question still stays: which of them?

Thanks


Not a problem. I can ship to you at wholesale price if you like.

CAPACITIES:
Engine, with filter..........8 quarts [1]

[1] On models with oil cooler, additional oil may be needed when
cooler is drained. Allow 5 minutes after refilling or
turning engine off before checking oil level.

I can also send you the oil filter at wholesale:
FILTERS:
Oil Filter MANN Oil Filter (HU7185x)

Learn more about Mann filters at https://www.amsoil.com/storefr...mann.aspx?zo=1181889

Check your email for more info.
quote:
Originally posted by howdymiro:
Thanks a lot Tim, but i'm not sure if we have here (in Rep. of Georgia) AMSOIL. We have a lot of diferent brands like SHELL & MOBILE1 & CASTROL.. etc(these 3 brands are most popular here)
So if i can't find AMSOIL i'll have to choose one of up named brandes. Question still stays: which of them?

Thanks


Since you need local avalability
Mobil1
Redline, Motul, Mobil, Royal Purple, all good oils, better than Wal Mart Autozone oils by a moonshot.
All of those Followed in AMSOIL footsteps.

I first tried Royal Purple and in 10 seconds I knew I would never use dead plants and animals in my vehicle ever again.

I only used RP once I went with AMSOIL and I get called every name in the book, Must mean I am doing a good thing.

I have a newly built 7.3 diesel with 3000 miles and AMSOIL 5W30 since the first start.
This engine will never see an oil change again!
Here is the first UOA at 912 miles http://www.ranchopower.com/wp-...97442-Sev1.pdf[/IMG]

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